hotsenator:

Shout out to all of the oldest children…who were used as the tester kids and now watch their younger siblings get away with stuff you would have been killed for.. Justice will never be restored

(via whatiwishicould)

glowcloud:

"This slur has been reclaimed" doesn’t mean everyone sees it that way, doesn’t mean it doesn’t still function as a slur, doesn’t mean it no longer carries the historical baggage of a slur and doesn’t mean it should be used by everyone without any regard for the feelings of those who it has been used against

(via carry-on-my-wayward-butt)

blackourstory:

DO YOU KNOW ABOUT BLACK TULSA? IF NOT… WHY NOT?

This horrific incident has been well documented, everywhere: from YouTube videos of survivor interviews to PBS Lesson Plans for school teachers. Please do your Google diligence:

  • From May 30 to June 1, 1921, white citizens of Tulsa bombed burned and shot up the “Little Africa” section of Tulsa FOR 18 HOURS STRAIGHT
  • Why would they do that? That same old lame excuse, a Black man supposedly did something to a white woman. But the real reason was ECONOMIC JEALOUSY. Whites may have called it Little Africa derisively, but there is a reason that Black Tulsa is known as Black Wall Street
  • In addition to the 300 Blacks killed, and over 1,000 residential homes burned to the ground, also destroyed were:
  • The Mt. Zion Baptist Church and five other churches; the Gurley Hotel, Red Wing Hotel, and Midway Hotel; the Tulsa Star and Oklahoma Sun newspaper offices; Dunbar Elementary School; Osborne Monroe’s Roller-Skating Rink; the East End Feed Store; the Y.M.C.A. Cleaners; the Dreamland Theater; a drug store, barbershop, banquet hall, several grocery stores, dentists, lawyers, doctors, and realtors offices; a U.S. Post Office Substation, as well the all-black Frissell Memorial Hospital. All told, marauding gangs of savage whites destroyed 40-square-blocks of Black economic and entrepreneurial prosperity!

64 years after the first bombing of an American city was committed against the Black residents of Tulsa… the second bombing of an American city took place in Philadelphia when the city bombed the black members of the MOVE organization. (see the blackourstory archive for details). 

Isn’t it a shame that 76 after the bombing of Tulsa, when Timothy McVeigh blew up the Murrah Federal Office Building in Oklahoma City, most historically illiterate Americans - including American “journalists” - responded as if it were the first time such a horror had been visited on Oklahoma. If only we knew.

While there are many lessons to be drawn from this, a few questions that stick out to me are these:

  • If the answer to Black second-class treatment from whites in America is supposedly to become the ultimate American capitalists…the ‘model minorities’… how do you explain Tulsa 1921?
  • For those Black folk who think that the sole answer to Black people’s problems is simply more Blacks becoming business owners and more Blacks spending money with other Blacks… how did that work out for our people in Tulsa in ‘21?
  • Considering not only Tulsa, but Rosewood, Florida, and many other thriving all-Black towns that you may know of that all met the same fate at the hands of murderous, envious, lazy crackers… WHEN ARE WE GOING TO ACKNOWLEDGE AND TAKE SERIOUSLY THE IDEA THAT BLACK WEALTH (ESPECIALLY ALL-BLACK WEALTH) WILL NEED TO BE PROTECTED WITH PHYSICAL FORCE?

There is a reason that Marcus Garvey AND Elijah Muhammad had armies of trained Black men as a huge part of their organizations. Many of us Black folk took those great men as jokes, yet NO BLACK LEADERS SINCE THOSE TWO have reached the same heights of economic and ideological success and unity of Black people. 

Not only do we need to LEARN THIS HISTORY, we need to start taking these events men and movements MORE SERIOUSLY, and doing some CRITICAL HISTORICAL ANALYSIS if we are ever to stop being on the bottom rung of every metric in American life. Not just some casual or accidental reading of history; some CRITICAL. HISTORICAL. ANALYSIS.

TULSA 1921 was real. PHILLY 1985 was real. Will it happen again?

(via octoswan)

medievalpoc:

metaquarry:

medievalpoc:

The idea behind this radical new treatment came from Africa, specifically from a slave named Onesimus, who shared his knowledge with Cotton Mather, the town’s leading minister and his legal owner. Boston still suffered dreadfully, but thanks to Onesimus and Mather, the terror linked to smallpox began to recede after Africans rolled up their sleeves—literally—to show Boston how inoculation worked. The story of how Boston began to overcome smallpox illustrates the strife that epidemics can cause, but also the encouraging notion that humans can communicate remedies as quickly as they communicate germs—and that the solutions we most need often come from the places we least expect to find them.

Mather had come close to choosing a career in medicine, and devoured the scientific publications of the Royal Society in London. As the society began to turn its attention to inoculation practices around the world, Mather realized that he had an extraordinary expert living in his household. Onesimus was a “pretty Intelligent Fellow,” it had become clear to him. When asked if he’d ever had smallpox, Onesimus answered “Yes and No,” explaining that he had been inoculated with a small amount of smallpox, which had left him immune to the disease. Fascinated, Mather asked for details, which Onesimus provided, and showed him his scar. We can almost hear Onesimus speaking in Mather’s accounts, for Mather took the unusual step of writing out his words with the African accent included—the key phrase was, “People take Juice of Small-Pox; and Cutty-skin, and Putt in a Drop.”

Excited, he investigated among other Africans in Boston and realized that it was a widespread practice; indeed, a slave could be expected to fetch a higher price with a scar on his arm, indicating that he was immune. Mather sent the Royal Society his own reports from the wilds of America, eager to prove the relevance of Boston (and by extension, Cotton Mather) to the global crusade against infectious disease. His interviews with Onesimus were crucial. In 1716, writing to an English friend, he promised that he would be ready to promote inoculation if smallpox ever visited the city again.

American History, but something I think a lot of people would be interested to read.

And here’s a biographical essay about Onesimus from the W.E.B. DuBois Research Center.

Thank you!

genderoftheday:

Today’s Gender of the day is: Trashed by a lady cyclist, who is noted for her athletic powers.

genderoftheday:

Today’s Gender of the day is: Trashed by a lady cyclist, who is noted for her athletic powers.

(via strawberryarabia)

dirtyberd:

craftylindsey:

lucifers-kittykat:

This is Susan Robinson, one of the last people in the country who can preform late term abortions after the murder of Dr. George Tiller. This is from an awesome documentary called After Tiller, about the last 4 late-term abortion practitioners in the country. It’s a great watch and available on Netflix, would strongly recommend. 

warrior woman

Each woman is “the world’s expert on their own lives” how important is that

(via heavensknightofhell)

ladythymelord:

ladythymelord:

My roommate is going through her dictionary, but instead of saying “floppy disk” it says “floopy disk”.

image

bioticbootyshaker:

dandelionofthanatos:

kingofbeartraps:

static-nonsense:

[text: So your friend has a chronic illness or disability…]
petticoatruler:

don’t
expect them to be able to go out on a whim
expect them to have lives just like yours
expect them to always be available
demand details of their illness that they haven’t volunteered, ask them nicely and don’t badger
offer help or assistance to make yourself feel like a better person
act as though the disease is catching, repugnant, or disgusting
challenge them to do things they have already told you were impossible
baby them or treat them as though they’re less competent mentally
tell other people about their illness(es)
suggest cures/treatments/holistic practices (since, you know, they probably have already tried it)
Try to relate their problem to your experience - your sprained ankle is nothing like chronic pain, your bout with stomach flu is nothing like IBS, your inability to focus before coffee is nothing like the mental fog that comes with illnesses like fibromyalgia or MS
ever, ever, ever accuse them of faking. ever.
do
understand that some chronic illnesses have good days and bad days, and that there’s no way to predict what’ll happen
be supportive and understand their limitations
ask about dietary or physical restrictions if you are making plans with them
ask about anything that might make things worse for them, and take it into account
tell them that if they need to tell you they can’t do something that you won’t be angry at them for not being able to, and don’t be passive-aggressive about it
remember that they are a person, not an illness
listen to them, ask them questions if you don’t understand something, and remember what they say
I’m sure I’m forgetting something, but this seems like a decent start. Please add your own.


I’d like to get that bolded one printed on a little card I can hand out every time someone says I should try reworking my diet/exercising more/some new vitamin/something else as a way to “fix” my depression, asthma, and MFS. 
I don’t care if it worked for your mother, your cousin, your sibling, your best friend.
My body is not their body, this has been attempted, these are not cures.
ALSO STOP TELLING ME THAT MY MEDICATIONS ARE MAKING THE DISEASES WORSE BECAUSE YOU ARE COMPLETELY WRONG.


omfg yes please?????

i had a small crew of random-ass people once get up in my LJ inbox and comments CONVINCED that CF is not genetic (uh, yes it is) and rather is a selenium deficiency (do wot) and that my enzyme supplements were eating away at my kidneys through my stomach (i don’t think they knew how anatomy anatomies)

i said “uh you realize i have to take antacid buffer pills so the enzymes don’t suffer murdercide at the hands of my ridiculous anxiety-empowered uber stomach acid right”

(this was five years back; the reflux issues have gone so i don’t need these daily anymore)

annnnnd they kept right on yowling until i blocked them.

ppl don’t take my asthma seriously at all and get mad at me when I can’t go somewhere at the drop of a hat. Like…  I’m sorry I’m such a burden but I kind of can’t fucking breathe today.

bioticbootyshaker:

dandelionofthanatos:

kingofbeartraps:

static-nonsense:

[text: So your friend has a chronic illness or disability…]

petticoatruler:

don’t

  • expect them to be able to go out on a whim
  • expect them to have lives just like yours
  • expect them to always be available
  • demand details of their illness that they haven’t volunteered, ask them nicely and don’t badger
  • offer help or assistance to make yourself feel like a better person
  • act as though the disease is catching, repugnant, or disgusting
  • challenge them to do things they have already told you were impossible
  • baby them or treat them as though they’re less competent mentally
  • tell other people about their illness(es)
  • suggest cures/treatments/holistic practices (since, you know, they probably have already tried it)
  • Try to relate their problem to your experience - your sprained ankle is nothing like chronic pain, your bout with stomach flu is nothing like IBS, your inability to focus before coffee is nothing like the mental fog that comes with illnesses like fibromyalgia or MS
  • ever, ever, ever accuse them of faking. ever.

do

  • understand that some chronic illnesses have good days and bad days, and that there’s no way to predict what’ll happen
  • be supportive and understand their limitations
  • ask about dietary or physical restrictions if you are making plans with them
  • ask about anything that might make things worse for them, and take it into account
  • tell them that if they need to tell you they can’t do something that you won’t be angry at them for not being able to, and don’t be passive-aggressive about it
  • remember that they are a person, not an illness
  • listen to them, ask them questions if you don’t understand something, and remember what they say

I’m sure I’m forgetting something, but this seems like a decent start. Please add your own.

I’d like to get that bolded one printed on a little card I can hand out every time someone says I should try reworking my diet/exercising more/some new vitamin/something else as a way to “fix” my depression, asthma, and MFS. 

I don’t care if it worked for your mother, your cousin, your sibling, your best friend.

My body is not their body, this has been attempted, these are not cures.

ALSO STOP TELLING ME THAT MY MEDICATIONS ARE MAKING THE DISEASES WORSE BECAUSE YOU ARE COMPLETELY WRONG.

omfg yes please?????

i had a small crew of random-ass people once get up in my LJ inbox and comments CONVINCED that CF is not genetic (uh, yes it is) and rather is a selenium deficiency (do wot) and that my enzyme supplements were eating away at my kidneys through my stomach (i don’t think they knew how anatomy anatomies)

i said “uh you realize i have to take antacid buffer pills so the enzymes don’t suffer murdercide at the hands of my ridiculous anxiety-empowered uber stomach acid right”

(this was five years back; the reflux issues have gone so i don’t need these daily anymore)

annnnnd they kept right on yowling until i blocked them.

ppl don’t take my asthma seriously at all and get mad at me when I can’t go somewhere at the drop of a hat. Like… I’m sorry I’m such a burden but I kind of can’t fucking breathe today.

(via 2spookymanamana)